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Preserving the Harvest: Canning, Freezing, and Drying

 

One blessing (or curse, depending on your mood) of eating local is experiencing bounty. But even the most ardent foodies can be overwhelmed by zucchini up the wazoo, bushels of berries, and mountains of tomatoes. Instead of letting all that beautiful, fresh produce go to waste, why not try your hand at perserving it?

There are four ways you can preserve fresh foods: Freezing, Canning, Pickling and Dehydrating. We will do our best to educate you on these processes, but here are a few books to help you along the way:


A great all-purpose guide:

Canning made simple:



The Dehydrator Bible (400+ recipes!!!)

The Dehydrator Bible: Includes over 400 Recipes




FREEZING:

Freezing is perhaps the easiest and most practical way to preserve food. Almost anything can be frozen- even whole tomatoes! Unlike other food preservation practices like pickling and canning freezing allows you to preserve your food without any acid or additives. Watery vegetables such as cucumbers, potatoes and celery turn soft upon freezing and should be canned instead. Green beans, peas and corn, on the other hand, make good candidates for freezing, since they retain their shape and texture even after being frozen and thawed.

Freeze flat.To make the most of freezer space, freeze food flat in freezer bags, then stack the bags horizontally or vertically in the freezer. Freeze fruits and vegetables (see more on freezing vegetables below) in freezer bags on a cookie sheet, or freeze first on a cookie sheet and then place in freezer bags to keep fruit or vegetables from sticking together.
Get the air out. Squeeze as much air as possible out of the freezer bag to not only save room in the freezer but also to keep food from developing freezer burn. Remove the maximum amount of air from the freezer bag by closing the top of the bag almost all the way, inserting a drinking straw and sucking the air out of the freezer bag. Obviously, you need to take care if using this method.
Temperature and circulation. Use a freezer thermometer and keep the freezer at 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Leave some space around frozen food packages so air can circulate to keep the freezer running efficiently.
Mark, date and list. It is difficult to mark cold freezer bags, so remember to mark freezer bags with what the contents are and the date frozen before you place food in the bags. Then keep a list of what you have stored in your freezer and refer to it when menu planning to you do not end up with the infamous "mystery mummified freezer food" that has lived too long in the recesses of your freezer!

Freezing Greens & Vegetables:

Dave prepares kale for freezing.

You need:

Fresh greens (spinach, kale, chard, etc) or vegetables (sweet corn, peppers, peas, green beans work well)
"Ziploc" type freezer bags (the freezer bag version is heavier and protects better against freezer burn.
1 large pot of boiling water
2 large bowls, one filled with cold water and ice.
1 sharp knife

Step 1 - Pick or select the veggies!

This is the most important step!  You need greens or veggies that are FRESH and crisp.  Limp, old greens will make nasty tasting frozen greens.  Select young, tender green leaves.

Step 2 - Wash the veggies !

Rinse the leaves/veggies in plain cold water.  I use a large bowl of cold water and a colander to let them drain.

Step 3 -Hull the greens/trim vegetables

Cut off any woody stems. or damaged pieces. Prepare vegetables as you would like them for cooking (shuck corn, slice peppers, trim green beans)

Step 4 - Get the pots  ready

Get the pot of boiling water ready (about 2/3 filled) and a LARGE bowl with ice and cold water.

Step 5 - Blanch the greens/vegetables.  

All fruits and vegetables contain enzymes and bacteria that, over time, break down the destroy nutrients and change the color, flavor, and texture of food during frozen storage. greens requires a brief heat treatment, called blanching, in boiling water or steam, to destroy the enzymes before freezing. Blanching times for collards is 3 minutes and all other greens 2 minutes.Begin counting the blanching time as soon as you place the greens in the boiling water. Cover the kettle and boil at a high temperature for the required length of time. You may use the same blanching water several times (up to 5). Be sure to add more hot water from the tap from time to time to keep the water level at the required height.

Step 6 - Cool the greens/vegetables

Cool greens/vegetables immediately in ice water. Drain them thoroughly (this shouldn't take more than a minute). After vegetables are blanched, cool them quickly to prevent overcooking. Plunge the greens/vegetables into a large quantity of ice-cold water (I keep adding more ice to it). A good rule of thumb: Cool for the same amount of time as the blanch step. For instance, if you blanch greens for 3 minutes, then cool in ice water for at least 3 minutes. Drain thoroughly. 

Step 7 - Bag

Fill the bag and remove the air to prevent drying and freezer burn. TIP:  If you don't own a vacuum food sealer to freeze foods, place food in a Ziploc bags, zip the top shut but leave enough space to insert the tip of a soda straw. When straw is in place, remove air by sucking the air out.  To remove straw, press straw closed where inserted and finish pressing the bag closed as you remove straw.

Step 8 - Done!

Pop them into the freezer, on the quick freeze shelf, if you have one!


Freezing Tomatoes:

Preparing for Freezing:

Wash and dip in boiling water for 30 seconds to loosen skins. Core and peel. Tomatoes can also be frozen whole or in pieces with skin still intact.

Best Freezing Method(s):

Raw Tomatoes

Freeze whole or in pieces. Pack into suitable containers, leaving l-inch headspace. Seal, label and freeze.

Tomato Juice

Cut washed and cored tomatoes into quarters or eighths. Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes. Press through a sieve. If desired, season with 1 teaspoon salt to each quart of juice. Pour into suitable containers leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Seal, label and freeze.

Stewed Tomatoes

Remove stem ends, peel and quarter ripe tomatoes. Cover and cook until tender (10 to 20 minutes depending on size). Place pan containing tomatoes in cold water to cool. Pack into suitable containers leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Seal, label and freeze.

Suitable Packaging:

Freezer containers should be moisture and vapor resistant and should not be prone to cracking or breaking at low temperatures. Containers should provide protection against absorbing flavors or odors and should be easy to label. Suitable packaging for freezing tomatoes includes freezer grade-plastic bags, rigid plastic containers and glass containers.

Maximum Storage Time:

10 to 12 months at 0ºF.

Thawing:

Thaw tomato products in the refrigerator, stove top or defrost them in the microwave according to your manufacturer's recommendations.

Freezing Berries:

Freezing Blueberries:

Rinse berries in cool water and pat dry with paper towels or a clean kitchen towel.

Pick over berries to make sure no stems, unripe berries, or damaged berries are in the mix.

Rinse berries with cool water and pat dry.

Lay berries in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet.

Put in freezer until frozen solid, usually overnight does the trick.

Transfer berries to resealable plastic storage bags, forcing as much air as possible out of the bag before sealing.

Store in the freezer until ready to use, up to 6 months.

Freezing Strawberries:

Make sure the berries are in good condition, i.e. no mold or discoloration.

Wash the berries in water and pat dry with a towel.

Remove stems and leaves from the top of each berry with a paring knife.

Place berries in a single layer on a baking sheet. They should not be touching. Place baking sheets in the freezer for  at least 7 hours or overnight.

Remove frozen berries from the freezer and pour into a ziploc bag, now that they are fully frozen, they should not stick together in the bag. Bags of frozen berries can now be put back into the freezer and stored up to 6 months. 

 Freezing Raspberries:

Put raspberries into a colander and dunk in cold water to wash gently. Lift and drain.

Place raspberries in a single layer on a cookie sheet and tray-freeze. Once frozen (within 24 hours), pack them into suitable containers, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Seal, label and freeze. Raspberries can also be packaged and placed directly into the freezer, although berries that are tray-frozen are less likely to freeze together in clumps.


CANNING:

(Photo Credits: photographer Rinne Allen)

(Photo Credits: Photographer Rinne Allen)

 

It's not as hard as it sounds! Canning is a great way to preserve foods that have a high acid content or value-added foods like jams, pickles, and salsas. There are two main methods of canning: the Boiling Water Bath method, which allows you to can acidic foods by processing jars in boiling water and the Pressure Canner method which allows you to heat-process low acid foods by using a specifically designed metal kettle with a lockable lid. These canners have jar racks, one or more safety devices, systems for exhausting air, and a way to measure or control pressure...not for the faint of heart!

We will only be addressing the user-friendly traditional Boiling Water Bath method here.

Please read through THIS GLOSSARY OF CANNING TERMS before proceeding.

Please read these GUIDELINES FOR FOOD SAFETY before proceeding.

Adjusting for altitude (yes this really does matter!): If you are preserving at an altitude higher than 1,000 feet above sea level, adjust boiling water processing time as indicated. Find out your altitude HERE.

ALTITUDE FEET INCREASE PROCESSING TIME
1,001-3,000 5 minutes
3,001-6,000 10 minutes
6,001-8,000 15 minutes
8,001-10,00 20 minutes


You will need:

Tongs: Have tongs ready for lifting hot foods out of boiling or simmering water. Any variety that you prefer will work, but a locking mechanism keeps them out of the way when not in use.

Jar lifter: This tool is a specialized set of tongs. Its rubberized ends fit securely around any size canning jar, to lift them in and out of your canner.

Canning funnel: Used for canning foods, this wide mouth tool keeps the rims of jars clean. It can also be used to fill ziplock bags neatly.

Canning jars: Canning jars are made from tempered glass to withstand the high heat and pressure of your canner. Both narrow- and wide-mouth jars are available, with wide-mouth being easiest to remove the food from once it is canned.

Water-bath canner. If you’re going to can, you must use the appropriate canner. For canning high-acid foods (fruits, jellies, relishes, and pickles), get a water-bath canner like THIS ONE.


The basic instructions are as follows:
  1. Prepare equipment and utensils.

    Examine the jars for nicks or chips, the screw bands for proper fit and corrosion, and the new lids for imperfections and scratches. Wash everything in warm, soapy water, rinsing the items well and removing any soap residue.

  2. Fill your canning kettle one-half to two-thirds full of water and begin heating the water.

    Heat extra water in a saucepan as a reserve.

  3. Submerge clean jars and lids in hot, not boiling, water.

    Use your canning kettle for the jars and saucepan for the lids.

  4. Transfer prepared food into the hot jars and release any air bubbles with a nonmetallic spatula.

    Add more prepared food or liquid to the jar after releasing the air bubbles to maintain the recommended headspace.

  5. Wipe the jar rims with a clean, damp cloth.

    You need the rims clean to properly place the lids.

  6. Place a hot lid onto each jar rim and hand-tighten the screw band.

    Make sure the sealant side is touching the jar rim.

  7. Suspend the jar rack on the inside edge of your canning kettle, place the filled jars in the jar rack, and lower the jar rack into the hot water.

    Make sure the jars are standing upright and not touching each other. If your jars aren’t covered by at least 1 inch of water, add boiling water from your reserve.

  8. Cover the kettle and heat the water to a boil, reducing the heat and maintaining a gentle boil.

    Start your processing time after the water boils. Maintain a boil for the entire processing period.

  9. At the end of the processing time, remove your jars from the kettle with a jar lifter and allow them to cool.

    Place them on a clean towel or paper towels. Completely cool the jars (12 to 24 hours).

  10. Test the seals on the cooled jars by pushing on the center of the lid.

    If the lid feels solid and doesn’t indent, you have a successful vacuum seal.

  11. Remove the screw bands from your sealed jars, then wash the sealed jars and the screw bands in hot, soapy water.

    This removes any residue from the jars and screw bands.

Label your filled jars, including the date processed, and store them (without the screw bands) in a cool, dark, dry place.


Two basic recipes to get you started:

Strawberry Jam (from Canning for a New Generation- buy the book!)
makes about 4 half-pint jars

3 lbs rinsed & hulled strawberries, diced (about 9 cups)
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 Tablespoons strained fresh lemon juice
grated zest of 2 lemons (optional)

Prepare for water-bath canning:
Sterilize the jars and keep them hot in the canning pot, put a small plate in the freezer and put the flat lids in a heat-proof bowl.

Put the strawberries and sugar in a wide, 6-8qt preserving pan. Bring to a simmer, stirring frequently, then continue to cook for 5 minutes. Pour into a colander set over a large bowl and stir the berries gently to drain off the juice. Return the juice to the pan and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, stirring occasionally, until the suyrup is reduced to about 1 1/2 cups, about 20 minutes.

Return the strawberries and any accumulated juice to the pan, along with the lemon juice and the zest (if using), and bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring frequently, until a small dab of the jam spooned onto the chilled plat and returned to the freezer for a minute becomes somewhat firm (it will not gel), about 15 mintues. Skim off as much foam as you can, then remove from the heat and stir gently for a few seconds to distribute the fruit in the liquid.

Ladle boiling water from the canning pot into the bowl with the lids. Using a jar lifter, remove the sterilized jars from the canning pot, carefully pouring the water from each one back into the pot, and place them upright on a folded towel. Drain the water off the jar lids.

Ladle the hot jam into the jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace at the top. Use a damp paper towel to wipe the rims of the jars, then put a flat lid and ring on each jar, adjusting the ring so that it's just finger-tight. Return the jars to the water in the canning pot, making sure the water covers the jars by at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil, and boil for 5 minutes to process. Remove the jars to a folded towel and do not disturb for 12 hours. After 1 hour, check that the lids have sealed by pressing down on the center of each; if it can be pushed down, it has NOT sealed, and the jar should be refrigerated immediately. Label the sealed jars and store.



All-Purpose Tomato Sauce (from Canning for a New Generation- buy the book!)
makes about 4 half-pint jars

**To peel tomatoes: bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Near the bowl of ice water, have ready a medium bowl (for the peels and seeds) and another bowl (for the peeled tomatoes).
A few at a time, drop the tomatoes into the boiling water; after 30 seconds, remove them with a slotted spoon to the ice bath to cool. Pull off the peels and cut out the core.**

About 12 lbs tomatoes, peeled
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
12 ounces onion, diced (about 2 small onions)
2 large cloves garlic
2 tsp pure kosher salt, or to taste
About 2 teaspoons citric acid

Break the tomatoes apart and use your fingers to scrape out the seeds. Working in batches, put the flesh in a blender or food processor and puree until very smooth. You should have 12 cups puree; reserve any extra for another use. Set aside.

In a wide, 6 - 8 quart preserving pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and saute until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and saute, stirring constantly for 1 minute. Pour the 12 cups tomato puree and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce darkens a shade and is reduced by 1/3, about 45 minutes. Season with salt to taste.

Meanwhile, Prepare for Water Bath Canning:

Wash the jars and keep them hot in the canning pot, and put the flat lids in a heatproof bowl.

Ladle boiling water from the canning pot into the bowl with the lids. Using a jar lifter, remove the hot jars from the canning pot, carefully pouring the water from each one back into the pot, and place them upright on a folded towel. Drain the water off the jar lids.

Put 1/2 tsp citric acid in each jar. Spoon the hot sauce into the jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace at the top. Use a damp paper towel to wipe the rims of the jars, then put a flat lid and ring on each jar, adjusting the ring so that it's just finger-tight. Return the jars to the water in the canning pot, making sure the water covers the jars be at least 1 inch. Bring to a boil, and boil for 35 mintues to precess. Remove the jars to a folded towle and do not disturb for 12 hours. After 1 hour, check if the lids have sealed by pressing down on the center of each; if it can be pushed down, it hasn't sealed, and the jar should be refrigerated immediately. Lable the sealed jars and store.
 
 
PICKLING:
(photo credit: Civil Eats)

Pickling is the process of preserving foods in a high-acid solution, either by adding vinegar or naturally by means of fermentation. Spoilers cannot grow in a high-acid environment. This state of high acidity is achieved in two ways: by means of salt and with vinegar. Dill pickles, Garlicky pickles, spicy pickles, sweet pickles, pickled beets, pickled beans, pickled carrots, you can pickle just about anything that you can grow, and some things you can't grow. You can even pickle fruits, eggs, meats, and really just about anything if you are adventurous enough!

Easy Refrigerator Pickles
Yield: 28 servings

   6 c  thin sliced cucumbers
   2 c  thin sliced onions
   1 1/2 c  vinegar
   1 c  sugar
   1/2 ts salt
   1/2 ts mustard seed
   1/2 ts celery seed
   1/2 ts ground turmeric

PLACE HALF OF THE CUCUMBER IN A ALRGE GLASS BOWL. TOP WITH HALF THE ONION. REPEAT THE PROCEDURE WITH THE REMAINING CUCUMBER AND ONION.  COMBINE VINEGAR AND REMAINING INGREDIENTS IN A SAUCE PAN; STIR WELL.  BRING TO A BOIL; BOIL 1 MINUTE. POUR THE MIXTURE OVER THE CUCUMBER AND ONION; LET COOL. COVER AND MARINATE IN REFRIGERATER FOR 4 DAYS.

Dilly Beans (from Canning for a New Generation- buy the book!)
Makes about 5 pint jars

4 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
3 tablespoons pure kosher salt
5 springs fresh dill
5 cloves garlic
5 or 10 dried red hot chiles
2 1/2 to 5 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
2 lbs crisp green beans, ends trimed, (4 1/2" long)

Prepare for water bath canning: Wash the jars and keep them hot in the canning pot, and put the flat lids in a heatproof bowl.
In a wide, 6 - 8 quart preserving pan, combine the vinegar, 4 cups water, and the salt. Bring just to a boil, stirring to dissolve the salt.
Ladle boiling water from the canning pot into the bowl with the lids. Using a jar lifter, remove the hot jars from the canning pot, carefully pouring the water from each one back into the pot, and place them upright on a folded towel. Drain the water off the jar lids.
Working quickly, put a sprig of dill, a clove of garlic, 1 or 2 dried chiles, and 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (if using), in each hot jar. Pack the beans in the jars, standing the upright. Ladle in the hot vinegar mixture, leaving 1/2 inch headspace at the top. Use a chopstick to remove air pupples around the inside of each jar. Use a damp paper towel to wipe the rims of the jars, then put a flat lid and ring on each jar, adjusting the ring so that it's just finger tight. Return the jars to the water in the canning pot, making sure the water covers the jars by at least 1". Bring to a simmer, and simmer for 10 mintes to process. Remove the jars to a folded towel and do not disturb for 12 hours. After 1 hour, check that the lids have sealed by pressing down on the center of each; if it can be pushed down, it hasn't sealed, and the jar should be refrigerated immediately. Label the sealed jars and store.
 

DEHYDRATING:
Photo Credit: Simmerboston.com
— from The Busy Person’s Guide to Preserving Food by Janet Chadwick
illustrations by Judy Eliason, Alison Kolesar, and Elayne Sears
 
Drying foods is a natural alternative for people with limited time and limited space for storing frozen or canned foods. Almost any food can be dried, but those most popularly dried are fruits, herbs, and a few vegetables including mushrooms.

Blanching or Dipping
Drying foods does not stop the enzymatic action that causes fruit to mature and decay; it only slows it down. Some foods keep well without pretreatment, but others deteriorate in color, flavor, texture, and nutrients for months after drying unless treated. Pretreatment can mean blanching or dipping the foods. Dipping can be accomplished using various preparations.

Salt water dip Dissolve 6 tablespoons flaked pickling salt in 1 gallon of lukewarm water. To keep fruit from darkening, slice or chop it directly into the water. Soak for no more than 5 minutes or the fruit will absorb too much water and acquire a salty taste. Drain before loading onto drying trays. This is not recommended for those on a low-sodium diet.

Ascorbic acid dip Ascorbic acid is a form of vitamin C. Dissolve 2 tablespoons of ascorbic acid crystals, 2 tablespoons of ascorbic acid powder, or 5 crushed, 1-gram vitamin C tablets in 1 quart of lukewarm water. Slice or chop fruits directly into the solution. When 1 to 2 cups of fruit accumulate, stir and remove the fruit with a slotted spoon. Drain well before drying.

Fruit juice dip Dip peaches, apples, or banana slices into 1 quart undiluted pineapple juice or 1 quart lukewarm water into which 1/4 cup of lemon juice has been stirred. Soak for 5 to 10 minutes and drain well before drying.



Drying Food in a Dehydrator

You will get the most consistent results from a dehydrator, and dehydrator drying is so trouble-free you can leave a dehydrator operating overnight or while you’re at work. If a load is almost dry at bedtime, reduce the heat to 105-degrees F to 110-degrees F and go to bed. By morning, the food will be ready to store.

  1. Clean your work surface and assemble knives, peelers, a cutting board, measuring cups and spoons, a bowl (if pretreating), a colander, and a heavy towel. Dehydrators come with their own drying trays.
  2. Select young, fresh vegetables and fruits that are table-ready or slightly immature. Wash, then drain on towels.
  3. Preheat dehydrator to the desired temperature. Recommended temperatures are 115-degrees F for uncooked fruits, 120-degrees F for vegetables and some cooked fruits, and 110-degrees F for leafy herbs.
  4. Peel, slice, dice, chop, julienne, halve, or leave whole, depending on recommendations for the fruit, vegetable, or herb. Pretreat or blanch according to recommendations for each.
  5. Spread foods evenly over dehydrator trays in thin layers. Different foods can be dried at the same time, but very moist foods should not be dried with almost-dry foods, nor should you combine foods with strong odors or flavors.
  6. Dry according to times specified for each food. Rotate the trays front to back, side to side, and top to bottom at least once. Also stir the food or turn it.
  7. Package dried foods in airtight bottles, jars, or plastic bags. Store in a cool, dark place.

Drying Food in a Conventional Oven
Drying food in an oven has the advantage of controlled, even temperatures, but the disadvantage of poor air circulation. Prepare foods as you would if you were using a dehydrator. You will need a large, easily readable thermometer that registers 100-degrees to 150-degrees F, an electric fan, and commercial or homemade drying trays.

  1. Set the thermometer on the top oven shelf and preheat to the desired temperature. Recommended temperatures are 115-degrees F for uncooked fruits, 120-degrees F for vegetables and some cooked fruits, and 110-degrees F for leafy herbs.
  2. Prepare the food, then spread it sparsely but evenly over the drying trays.
  3. Place the trays in the oven. To improve air circulation, allow 1 inch of space on each side, 3 inches on top and bottom, and 2 1/2 inches between trays. In addition, leave the door ajar a few inches and place an electric fan in front of the door to blow away moist air.
  4. Dry according to the directions for each food. Stir or turn the food occasionally and rotate the trays front to back, side to side, and top to bottom every 2 to 3 hours.
  5. Package the dried foods in airtight bottles, jars, or plastic bags. Store in a cool, dark place.

Let The Sun Do Your Drying
If you are blessed with clean air, low humidity, and an abundance of hot, sunny days, sun-drying is the least expensive and simplest method of preserving foods. But drying outdoors is unpredictable unless the temperatures are over 100-degrees F and humidity is low. If the temperature is too low, the humidity is high, or both, spoilage will occur before drying is achieved. Because sun-drying is slower and food is exposed for a longer period of time, pretreating is important.

Begin by pretreating and preparing your foods. Your drying trays can be cookie sheets or homemade wooden trays, but those made of fiberglass or stainless steel screening work best. Do not use galvanized screening, which contaminates food. You’ll also need cheesecloth to protect food from insects and birds.

  1. Spread foods sparsely but evenly over your drying trays in thin layers. Different foods can be dried at the same time. Cover with cheesecloth.
  2. Place the trays in a well-ventilated spot in full sun. Turn or stir the food every few hours, and take the trays inside at night. Dry according to the recommendations for each food, but do not include inside time when calculating drying time.
  3. Before storing, place foods in an oven set at 125-degrees F for 30 minutes to kill insect eggs that may have been deposited on them, or place the foods in a freezer for a day or two.
  4. Package foods in airtight bottles, jars, or plastic bags. Store in a cool, dark place.

 

 
GOOD LUCK PRESERVING THE HARVEST!
 
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Time to sign up for the 2014 Warner Farm CSA!January 21st, 2014

                  Warner Farm CSA 2014 is here! And CSA sign up is now open! Dear Friends of Warner Farm,It's that time again! Time to sign up for the 201

Photo(s) added: Early Morning Spinach Harvest, We've gone solar!, Beautiful Cherry Tomatoes, Strawberries!, Warner Farm Pick Your Own, Amherst Farmers' Marker, Fresh AsparagusJanuary 18th, 2014

New photo added: , , , , , ,

Pick Your Own opening June 12th!June 4th, 2013

You asked and we are answering: Warner Farm pick-your-own will be opening Wednesday June 12th at our farmstand on Old Amherst Rd in Sunderland.

Mike's Maze 2013